though

(Pronounced [[t]ðoʊ[/t]] for meanings 1 and 2, and [[t]ðo͟ʊ[/t]] for meanings 3 to 5.)
1) CONJ-SUBORD You use though to introduce a statement in a subordinate clause which contrasts with the statement in the main clause. You often use though to introduce a fact which you regard as less important than the fact in the main clause.

Gaelic has been a dying language for many years, though children are nowadays taught it in school...

After news of this new court case Ford broke down again, though he blamed the breakdown on his work...

He's very attractive, though certainly not a ladykiller...

Cleveland has always had a reputation for being a dirty, ugly, boring city, though now they say it is much better.

Syn:
2) CONJ-SUBORD You use though to introduce a subordinate clause which gives some information that is relevant to the main clause and weakens the force of what it is saying.

I look back on it as the bloodiest (though not literally) winter of the war...

The problem was finally, though not conclusively, identified as a severely pinched nerve...

His achievements, though hardly exciting, were widely admired.

Syn:
3) ADV: ADV with cl You use though to indicate that the information in a clause contrasts with or modifies information given in a previous sentence or sentences.

I like him. Though he makes me angry sometimes...

I want to try my hand at politics, or go back to the law. I don't want to go to school for it, though...

It might be worth your while to go to court. This is tricky, though, and you'll need expert advice.

Syn:
4) PHRASE: PHR with cl You can say though I say so myself or even though I say it myself when you are praising yourself or something you have done, but do not want to sound too proud. [mainly SPOKEN]

I'm a good cook, though I say it myself...

Even though I do say it myself we've probably got the best little restaurant in town.

5) as thoughsee as
even thoughsee even

English dictionary. 2008.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • though — [ ðou ] function word *** Though can be used in the following ways: as a conjunction (connecting two clauses or phrases): Though she was very tired, she could not sleep. as a way of showing how a sentence is related to what has already been said… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • Though — ([th][=o]), conj. [OE. thogh, [thorn]ah, AS. [eth]e[ a]h, [eth][=ae]h, [eth][=e]h; akin to OS. th[=o]h, OFries. thach, D. & G. doch but, yet, OHG. doh but, yet though, Icel. [thorn][=o] yet, nevertheless, Sw. dock, Dan. dog, Goth. [thorn][ a]uh,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • though — though, although, albeit introduce subordinate clauses stating something that is or may be true in spite of what is asserted in the main clause. Though, the most widely used of these words, can introduce a clause that states an established fact… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • though — [thō] conj. [ME thah, thogh < OE theah & ON tho, akin to Ger doch, yet, however, Goth thauh] 1. in spite of the fact that; notwithstanding that; although [though the car was repaired, it rattled] 2. and yet [they will probably win, though no… …   English World dictionary

  • Though — Though, adv. However; nevertheless; notwithstanding; used in familiar language, and in the middle or at the end of a sentence. [1913 Webster] I would not be as sick though for his place. Shak. [1913 Webster] A good cause would do well, though.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • though — c.1200, from O.E. þeah, and in part from O.N. þo though, both from P.Gmc. *thaukh (Cf. Goth. þauh, O.Fris. thach, M.Du., Du. doch, O.H.G. doh, Ger. doch), from PIE demonstrative pronoun *to (see THAT (Cf. that)). The evolution of the terminal… …   Etymology dictionary

  • though — [adv] however after all, all the same, for all that, howbeit, nevertheless, nonetheless, notwithstanding, still, still and all, withal, yet; concept 544 though [conj] while albeit, allowing, although, but, despite, despite the fact, even if, even …   New thesaurus

  • though — ► CONJUNCTION 1) despite the fact that; although. 2) however; but. ► ADVERB ▪ however: he was able to write, though. ORIGIN Old English …   English terms dictionary

  • though — index regardless Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • though — though1 W1S1 [ðəu US ðou] conj 1.) used to introduce a statement that makes the main statement coming after it seem surprising, unlikely, or unexpected = ↑although ▪ Though she s almost 40, she still plans to compete. ▪ Pascal went ahead with the …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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